Thursday, 11 September 2014

The Assem Allam press conference: More questions than answers



Things Assem & I agree on:

He has a simple mind.

It is best the FA don’t allow teams to be called Red-bottomed FC.

He should ensure the club goes to a good home.

There are some backwards councilors in Hull.

He is not a “dictorial”. I’m not sure anyone is. Maybe whoevers job it is to think up new words?

Things I know are bullshit:

The official name of the club has not contained the word Tigers for 110 years. The company name has contained the word since 2000. No-one else in the world thinks the “official” name is Hull City Tigers apart from Assem Allam.

Arsenal Gunners is NOT different to Hull Tigers. It’s the same crime.

24 hours from December 1st or April 9th is not September 10th. No matter how many times you claim it is.

This is definitely related to his fall out with Hull City council – either directly or indirectly due to the stadium being out of his reach.

There is no “silent majority”. Only silence.

Changing a club’s 110 year old name is a misuse that the FA should protecting against.

Assem Allam does not have the money to make Hull City a top five club. I admire ambition but that is just crazy. Changing the name will not change that. In Ehab Allam’s wildest dreams, the name change is worth £10m per season. Or half a Manchester City substitute’s wife’s dog’s signing on fee.

The only instability at Hull City it that being caused by Assem Allam.

He will not give the club away. A £70m+ debt is not free.

There was no secret sponsor willing to pay £1m extra per season depending on the name change unless Assem Allam is calling his son a blatant liar?

Fans do not contribute financially to the club. Nonsense. We’ve paid a lot of money for a lot of years.

There are no Premier League clubs between Wigan and Rotterdam or Newcastle and Birmingham.

Things I couldn’t explain using Google, Siri or the Encyclopedia Britannica:

Where did David Burns get his jacket from?

Is it better to by fishing tackle or takeaway food? What if you don’t live near a lake?

What Nissan have got to do with anything? Are they the mystery sponsor?

If a tree falls in the KC Stadium on a non-matchday, would anyone hear it?

If not being a “global” club in the Premier League is unsustainable – how do the other 14 survive?

Would Red-bottomed FC wear shorts or just thongs?

If only the club “Hull City” is for sale, is he keeping the council?

Who would buy KFC from the KC Stadium on a non-matchday?

What IS the problem here?

Monday, 1 September 2014

Nations represented in black & amber

How many different nations have been represented in Black and Amber over the years? Using the 209 FIFA members as a guide, I started to make a list. Place of Birth or International representation counted as criteria.Where more than one, a few of the most famous examples are used.

Count  = 50.

Algeria - Kamel Ghilas
Angola - Rui Marques, Manucho
Argentina - Adrian Caceres
Antigua and Barbuda - Marc Joseph
Australia - Jason Van Blerk, Richard Garcia
Austria - Martin Pusic
Bermuda - Kyle Lightbourne
Bosnia-Herzegovina - Eldin Jakupović
Brazil - Geovanni, Adriano Basso
Canada - Patrick Dickinson
Cayman Islands - Jamie Wood
Côte d'Ivoire - Yann Ekra
Croatia - Nikica Jelavic
Denmark - Viggo Jensen, Henrik Pedersen
Egypt - Amr Zaki
England - Raich Carter, Ken Wagstaff, Dean Windass
Faroe Islands - Julian Johnsson
Finland - Mauno Rintanen
France - Bernard Mendy
Gabon - Daniel Cousin
Germany - Nick Proschwitz
Greece - Stelios Giannakopoulos
Grenada - Delroy Facey
Guinea - Kamil Zayatte
Guyana - Leon Cort
Honduras - Maynor Figueroa
Hungary - Peter Halmosi, Peter Gulacsi
India - Paddy Mills
Italy - Vito Mannone
Jamaica - Theo Whitmore, Ian Goodison, Marlon King
Netherlands - Richard Sneekes, George Boateng, Jan Venegoor Of Hesslink
New Zealand - Heremaia Ngata
Nigeria - Jay-Jay Okocha, Seyi Olofinjana
Northern Ireland - Alan Fettis, Roy Carroll, Stuart Elliott
Norway - Joshua King
Peru - Nolberto Solano
Portugal - Sergio Leite, Ricardo Vaz Te
Republic of Ireland - Ken De Mange, Caleb Folan, Paul McShane
Scotland - Ian McKechnie, Billy Bremner, Paul Hunter
Senegal - Ibrahima Sonko
Seychelles - Kevin Betsy
Slovenia - Robert Koren
South Africa - George Wienand
Spain - Antonio Doncel, Daniel Ayala
St. Kitts and Nevis - Kevin Francis
St. Lucia - Colin Alcide
Switzerland - Eldin Jakupović
Trinidad and Tobago - Clint Marcelle, Tony Warner
Tunisia - Tijani Belaid
USA - Jozy Altidore, Brad Guzan
Wales - Boaz Myhill
Zambia - Iain Hesford